Center for Violence Prevention

Crisis Line 601-932-4198

In-State Toll Free 1-800-266-4198

Human Trafficking 1-888-373-7888 

©2018 by Center for Violence Prevention. Proudly created with Wix.com

FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Knowledge is power

Where is information on Human Trafficking victim services?

The Tower, it is the name of the only human trafficking shelter in the state of Mississippi.

Where is information on The Bridge?

The Bridge Forensic Services

What does "Survivors of Homicide" mean?

We offer this program to victims that had a relative die from homicide, which is stemmed from domestic violence. You can view more information and obtain a copy of the PDF on Victim Services.

How can I donate?

Food, clothing, or household items can be donated to our 2nd Chance Store at 409 Roberts St Pearl, MS 39408.

Donate buttons are located on the Home page or on the Get Involved section. If you'd rather donate with check or money order, mail it to our PO BOX 6279 Pearl, MS 39288.

Where do I sign up to volunteer?

Info on the Lotus Advocacy Program is here. Here, you can find a PDF to download and fill out for a background check.

I know someone in a crisis situation, but she doesn't speak English.

We can still help! A lot of our staff is Spanish bilingual, and those who aren't have the knowledge to operate Google translate. CVP will network with local colleges for a translator to assist with case management.

A Way Out

Everyone has the right to be safe from threats and violence, but you must take the first step. Once you recognize that it is not your fault, and you can change your situation, look for the help you need.

Knowledge...

This is one of the simplest ways to help our cause. We believe that the best way for our initiatives to succeed is for the community to become actively involved. This is an easy and efficient way to contribute to the great work we do at the Center for the prevention of violence. Contact any questions about how you can volunteer your time today.

Why don't victims just "leave"?

  • Fear of reprisals, shame, or humiliation keeps victims trapped in violent homes.

  • Batterers commonly deny responsibility for their behavior by blaming the victim for the abuse.

  • Victims receive strong incentives to stay, such as threats of harm and threats against the victim's children, friends, and family.

  • Victims are urged to responsibility from violence and be blamed.

  • By seeking help from community agencies, victims are too often given answers that encourage them to meet with the aggressor or minimize abuse.

  • The victims are subjected and discouraged by the failed search for help and learn to suffer in silence and isolation.